Light Chambers

Release of new work "Fran Maguire Sculpture" - Morven Lane, Marlborough.

Marlborough ceramic artist Fran Maguire's clay sculptures "Light chambers" is turning heads and hearts as well as wheels. Always on the edge of her ideas Maguire's empathy with the environment through her evolving understanding and application comes together in a glorious culmination of artistic creativity and her people love it.

These new works emerge from three recent and long held impressions which began over 20 years ago when in 1986 she read Oliver Sacks' - The man who mistook his wife for a hat, a book about rare mental disorders. One of the case studies tells of a man who could not recognize familiar objects; when a presented with a glove described it very eloquently as 'a continuous surface enfolded in upon itself with five small outpouchings'.

Her first impression of form and fluidity, endured. A stay on the Great Barrier Reef with its delicate beauty and interaction of movement around the reef formed her second impression underpinning her commitment to the environment's fragility. Her third impression originated from wind blown birds nests out of trees, inspired thoughts and observations of empty nests, hopeful nests, homes and people, nurturing, protective and safe but fragile and subject to outside influence.

In plain terms, the work with holes is about light says Maguire.
"They are light chambers. Ideally they should be placed somewhere where they receive long shafts of morning or evening light because for an hour or so each day they will glow. I am interested in light, shadow and reflection and how natural light subtly changes the work; energetic and yet calming. The vessels are thrown on the wheel. They challenge me physically, intellectually and technically. These works have given me a clue to the energy held in natural light" she says.

To release them to the community, Maguire previewed her sculptures at home, from her nest receiving an enthusiastic near sell out reaction. Subsequently, perceived as a presentation to her peers, she's submitted work for the 2008 New Zealand Societies of Potters Annual Exhibition in Christchurch.

Maguire stops making things when they have evolved. For the moment she is gravitating towards life and beyond light and time working she says to a point 'where it bends back on itself'. That will take an age.

Toni Gillan

To view the works please click on the images: